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Marianapolis’ Valedictorian and Salutatorian Prepared for College and Beyond

THOMPSON, CONN. – Daniel Twohig-Mann will deliver the valedictory address and Ian MacKenzie will deliver the salutatory addresses at Marianapolis’ Class of 2022 commencement ceremony on June 5.

Twohig-Mann, son of Marian Twohig and Thierry Mann, hails from Douglas, MA and will attend University of Massachusetts Amherst in the fall, with a major in physics.

During his time at Marianapolis, Twohig-Mann says, “I’ve gained a much better understanding of the world [...] I feel like the teachers did really well at making their classes relevant to life beyond high school and college. The international diversity also helped me appreciate many different cultures and histories that I had not before.” To his success, he attributes “a willingness to work hard, as well as luck.” Notes Twohig-Mann, “part of this luck was finding teachers who were highly motivating, and whose classes were highly engaging and inspiring. Without the environment they supported, academic success would not have been as achievable.”

His favorite memories from his time at Marianapolis include “any one of the bus rides home from soccer matches this past season. The camaraderie and easygoing environment made [those rides] really fun, and I’ll remember them for a long time.”

Looking ahead to college and beyond, Twohig-Mann says, “I’m excited to take a lot of interesting classes and to have some fun, novel experiences. As I get older, I’m looking forward to developing more as a productive member of society, and hopefully working on the kinds of projects that substantially improve people’s lives.”

MacKenzie, son of Elena Poloukhine-MacKenzie and Andrew MacKenzie, hails from Woodstock, CT and will attend the University of Notre Dame in the fall, with a major in neuroscience and behavior, and a pre-med focus.

During his time at Marianapolis, MacKenzie notes, “I have grown by learning that [...] people will have different beliefs, ideas, and workstyles, and that’s okay. Differences don’t inhibit friendship. I have also grown to become more inclined to enjoy time with others. As someone who saw work as the number one priority for most of my four years, I can definitely say that over time (especially within these last few months), I have come to understand that there is a balance that needs to be created between a social life and an academic life.”

To his success, MacKenzie says, “I attribute three things; my parents, my work ethic, and sacrifice. My parents taught me everything I know. Whenever I needed advice, guidance, or a helping hand in times of need, they were always there for me [...] Everything they taught me went into my work ethic. Whether it was a simple coding assignment that I could complete in 15 minutes during office hours, or a project that required consecutive all-nighters to perfect, I knew that the job wasn’t done until it was the best I could put forth [...] Sacrifice is something I became accustomed to very quickly when it came to my work. Whether it was my sleep, free-time, or time with friends, it would occasionally need to be pushed out of the way to get here. While there were moments where I questioned the sacrifice, I knew that it would inevitably be worth it in the end.”

MacKenzie’s favorite recent memory from his time at Marianapolis is senior movie night, which provided an opportunity to enjoy a movie with friends.

Looking ahead to college and beyond, MacKenzie says, “I am looking for a fresh start to take what I have learned in high school and truly enjoy the next 4 years [...] Taking the balance I have begun to build on in the final moments of my time in high school, I intend on making college an unforgettable experience, with close connections and relationships that will last a lifetime. [After college,] I look forward to more than just finding a career that I enjoy, but using it to stand out and make a noticeable impact on the world. No matter where I end up, I want to make the most of my time and stand out among the crowd, while enjoying life to its fullest.”